Texas Tough: Jill Bedgood, Amita Bhatt, Sharon Kopriva, and Sherry Owens

June 6, 2013 - August 24, 2013

Featuring Jill Bedgood, Amita Bhatt, Sharon Kopriva, and Sherry Owens

View Exhibition

  • Book of Hours: Intervention
  • Book of Hours: Intervention
  • Texas Tough
  • Texas Tough
  • A Fantastic Collision of Three Worlds
  • A Fantastic Collision of Three Worlds
  • From Terra to Verde
  • Cathedral Green

Texas Tough: Jill Bedgood, Amita Bhatt, Sharon Kopriva, and Sherry Owens

  • June 6, 2013 -
  • August 24, 2013

Featuring Jill Bedgood, Amita Bhatt, Sharon Kopriva, and Sherry Owens

Jill Bedgood's Artist Statement:

Book Of Hours: Intervention

Referencing small devotional books used daily and as yearly calendars of spiritual practice, the installation "Books of Hours: Interventions" meditates on medical intrusions of the body to heal an illness. Each "book" is unique containing a relief of an object used in an "intervention" of the flesh or mind, or ones used in requesting an "intercession" from the universe, or those that provoke a memory providing solace. Objects include, for example, a needle, IV regulator, religious medallion, drugs, swab, bottle lid, key. In others, the book pages are manipulated to indicate the effects time has on the natural world. The white marble appearance speaks to memorialization of the individual, of medical procedures, of simple objects one contemplates visually and uses daily. The books are a collective experience; life is woven from our sensory encounters with objects, making them valued. Books of Hours acts also as a "memento mori", a contemplative reminder of our own mortality.

Amita Bhatt's Artist Statement:

Depends Who You Ask

This body of work is anchored in the historic and global phenomenon of geographic and identity politics and seeks to analyze the drama of life, desire, loss, hope, death, violence, conflict, dislocation, and eventual transcendence by combining mythology, and happenstance to create a hyper real stage. Seeking to charge this work with a primal energy while creating utopias/dystopias that are in acceptance of ecstasy and benevolence as well as darkness, suffering, and turmoil. Everything is part of the scheme. Relying heavily on seemingly disjointed imagery to mirror man's condition and the chaotic and unpredictable power struggles of the contemporary world these wall-sized drawings are infused with a magnified sense of theatrics. Just below the surface of these perverse, funny, playful and sometimes absurd worlds lurk the seething potential of violence ready to burst forth and consume if one looses guard for but a second. This employment of random objects and events also allows fracturing the surface of the canvas without tearing apart the dizzying visual whole while paying homage to mankind's resilience. The lines continue to remain simple.

Sharon Kopriva's Artist Statement:

From Terra To Verde

"A painter as well as a sculptor, Kopriva's two dimensional works render religious iconography strongly suggestive of an afterlife. Her floating virgins are pictured as apparitions, and her landscapes of towering trees are cathedral-like in their reach towards heaven. In dealing with the transitory nature of life and death, her treatment of the human condition is anything but maudlin. She manages to imbue her art with a quality that is most powerfully felt as virtues caught in transition-cherished as saintly aspiration or human failure tinged with greed and malice." - Jim Edwards, Curator in Residence at Houston Baptist University

Sherry Owens' Biography:

Origins

Sherry Owens, a native Texan, lives and works in Dallas. She received a BFA from Southern Methodist University in 1972 and the Moss/Chumley North Texas Artist Award in 1999. She is a former president of the Texas Sculpture Association, has served on various art boards and was a co-founder of the Emergency Artists' Support League. Owens has been in numerous exhibitions throughout Texas and the southwest including solo exhibitions at Haggar Gallery, University of Dallas; Women & Their Work, Austin; Martin Museum, Baylor University; Irving Arts Center; and Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos. Owens is known for her meticulous crepe myrtle sculptures, as well as large outdoor works in steel and bronze. Informed by observations in nature, she constructs nest-like objects using twigs and branches to create both dense, chaotic forms and open drawings in space.

For more information visit Jill Bedgood, Amita Bhatt, Sharon Kopriva, and Sherry Owens’ websites.